Thinking about pursuing a bachelor’s degree in psychology at CWRU?

There are many reasons to major in psychology. You may want to learn more about the brain, emotions, cognition, social behavior, or psychological health. Psychology is a very broad field and there are many different tracks from research to practice, or both, in a wide range of areas. Pursuing a bachelor’s degree in psychology at CWRU can help jump start your career as a therapist, counselor, consultant, teacher, lawyer, researcher, or physician, just to name a few.

Gain breadth in psychological topics as you learn about the neural bases of emotions, types of psychological disorders, how we learn and create memories, and how children develop in our lecture courses. Further develop that knowledge in small seminar courses with our professors while you learn about how to evaluate and conduct scientific research, learn about psychophysiology, and develop your own research projects.

Although graduate degrees are required for some careers, only about 40 percent of students who pursue a bachelor’s degree in psychology go to graduate school or professional training after they graduate. A much greater number of students go directly into the workforce.

Why choose Psychology at CWRU?

The Psychology faculty at CWRU focus on teaching as much as research and blend these together seamlessly! For instance, students are offered a small hands-on research methods course, and a number of senior Capstone course offerings. In these courses, students get to know faculty and dive into their own research ideas.

A number of our Psychology majors go on to work closely with research faculty to develop their research ideas into fully functional studies. SOURCE offers small research grants to undergraduate students for studies that require funding. Many of these projects become presentations at international conferences or even publications, including in top-tier Psychology journals!

Past projects have included a research study on how Rubik’s Cube training influences problem solving performance, a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of growth mindset interventions in classrooms, and survey studies on the LGBT community.

To learn more about the accomplishments of our students and the cutting edge research being conducted by our faculty and students check out our highlights below.  Please also check out our brochure. We hope to see you next fall!

Highlights

IMPACT Program Provides Mentorship to Underrepresented COSI/CSD Students

Lauren Calandruccio, associate professor in the Department of Psychological Sciences at Case Western Reserve University, recently received a grant from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association to create the Innovative Mentoring and Professional Advancement through Cultural Training (IMPACT) program. IMPACT is a one-year program, launched earlier this year, that provides formal...

Mandel School Dean Grover C. Gilmore to retire at end of academic year

When Grover “Cleve” Gilmore agreed to lead the Jack, Joseph, and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences in 2002, his appointment was only supposed to last a year. After all, he was a longtime professor of psychology, not social work. And, the request had come from an interim...

Psychology researchers recruiting 7th through 12th graders to participate in paid video-platform creativity study!

Case Western Reserve University faculty member, Dr. Sandra Russ, PhD, and her graduate student, Alexis Lee, MA, in the Department of Psychological Sciences are seeking pre-adolescents and adolescents to take part in a research initiative looking at aspects of creativity. WHO? Young people in grades 7th through 12th both...

When playtime and COVID collide

The New York Times: Sandra Russ, Distinguished University Professor and the Louis D. Beaumont University Professor, discussed how children are incorporating COVID-19 in their pretend play. She said studies have shown children in pediatric hospitals who incorporate their experience into play—by performing “surgery” on their stuffed animals, for example—experience...

Register now: Understanding Suicidality and How to Help

This free (Zoom) talk, hosted by the Rocky River Public Library will cover common myths and facts about suicide, risk and protective factors, warning signs, and how to offer/seek help, including how to approach the conversation with someone you are worried about, a very brief overview of treatments, coping...

Letter to the College Community from Outgoing Interim Dean Sandra Russ

June 23, 2020 Dear Members of the College Community, Ten months ago, when I became interim dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, no one anticipated the challenges that the university, our nation and the world would be confronting at this moment. We mourn the tragic, continuing loss of life...

Rita Obeid co-writes paper on racial bias and autism identification

Rita Obeid, full-time lecturer in the Department of Psychological Sciences, recently co-wrote a paper exploring the relationship between racial bias and autism identification. The paper, published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, builds on research showing minority populations are frequently misdiagnosed or diagnosed later in life for autism...

Elizabeth Short is lead author on study about role of language in children’s play

Elizabeth Short, professor of psychological sciences, was lead author of a study about the role of language in children’s play. The study explored how children who have various developmental disabilities (ADHD, autism spectrum disorder, and language delay) played compared to their peers of typical development. Results suggested language delays highlighted...