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Undergraduate Psychology Courses and Descriptions

Course Listing

PSCL 101 – General Psychology I
PSCL 102 – General Psychology II
PSCL 230 – Child Psychology
PSCL 282 – Quantitative Methods in Psychology
PSCL 313 – Psychology of Personality
PSCL 315 – Social Psychology
PSCL 317 – Health Psychology
PSCL 321 – Abnormal Psychology
PSCL 325 – Psychotherapy and Personality Change
PSCL 329 – Adolescence
PSCL 334C – Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Children
PSCL 335C – Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Child
PSCL 340 – Seminar and Practicum with Aging Populations
PSCL 344 – Developmental Psychopathology
PSCL 350 – Behavior Genetics
PSCL 352 – Physiological Psychology
PSCL 353 – Psychology of Learning
PSCL 355 – Sensation and Perception
PSCL 357 – Cognitive Psychology
PSCL 369 – Adult Development and Aging
PSCL 375 – Research Design and Analysis
PSCL 379 – Neurodevelopmental Disabilities
PSCL 388 – Human Sexual Behavior
PSCL 390 – Seminars in Psychology
PSCL 391 – Psychology Capstone Research Using Data Archives
PSCL 392 – Capstone Seminar: Positive Psychology and Character Strengths
PSCL 394 – Capstone Seminar: Current Problems
PSCL 395 – Capstone and Honors Program
PSCL 396 – Anxiety and Depression Symptoms, Etiology, and Treatment
PSCL 397 – Independent Study
PSCl 398C – Child Policy Externship

Course Descriptions

PSCL 101 – General Psychology I – 3 credits Taught by: Jane Buder-Shapiro, Robert Greene, TJ McCallum.
Methods, research, and theories of psychology. Basic research from such areas as psychophysiology, sensation, perception, development, memory, learning, psychopathology, and social psychology.

PSCL 102 – General Psychology II – 3 credits Taught by: Jane Buder-Shapiro.
The application of psychological research in normal problems of adjustment. Topics include: coping with anxiety, romance and marriage, and interpersonal behavior.

PSCL 230 – Child Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: Elizabeth Short.
Basic facts and principles of psychological development from the prenatal period through adolescence. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 282 – Quantitative Methods in Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: Arin Connell.
The theory and application of basic methods used in the analysis of psychological data. Not available for credit to students who have completed STAT 201.

PSCL 313 – Psychology of Personality – 3 credits
The development and organization of personality; theories of personality and methods for assessing the person; problems of personal adjustment.

PSCL 315 – Social Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: Jen Butler.
Empirical studies of typical human responses to situations. First impressions, attitude change, effects of cash incentives, behavior in emergencies, interpersonal attraction, impression management, crowding, stress, vices. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 317 – Health Psychology – 3 credits
Examines psychological processes that affect physical health. Covers the physiological factors affecting the immune system, chronic physical disorders, pain, compliance with prescribed medical treatments, the effects of stress and coping, the hospital and the health care systems. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 315

PSCL 321 – Abnormal Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: James Overholser, Amy Przeworski
Major syndromes of mental disorders, their principal symptoms, dynamics, etiology, and treatment. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 325 – Psychotherapy and Personality Change – 3 credits Taught by: James Overholser
Three methods of psychotherapy (behavioral, psychoanalytic, and client-centered) are discussed. The therapy techniques and the manner by which personality change is effected are examined. PREREQUISITE; PSCL 101

PSCL 329 – Adolescence – 3 credits Taught by: Elizabeth Short
Psychological perspectives on physical, cognitive, and social development. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 334C – Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Children – 3 credits Taught by: Sandra Russ
Supervised field placement and attendance at staff conferences in various child and adolescent settings. Regular seminar meetings. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 230

PSCL 335C – Seminar and Practicum: Hospitalized Child – 3 credits Taught by: Sandra Russ
Supervised field placement and attendance at staff conferences in various child and adolescent settings. Regular seminar meetings. PREREQUISITES: PSCL 230 and Junior or Senior standing.

PSCL 344 – Developmental Psychopathology – 3 credits Taught by: Arin Connell
This course will focus on the interplay of biological, psychological, familial, and social determinants of disorders ranging from autism to delinquency and bulimia. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 230 or PSCL 321.

PSCL 350 – Behavior Genetics – 3 credits Taught by: Lee Thompson
Examines the impact of both nature and nurture on human behavior. Basic quantitative genetic methodology will be covered. Current family, twin, and adoption studies in the areas of personality, intelligence, alcoholism, criminality, and psychopathology will be reviewed. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 352 – Physiological Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: Heath Demaree
The nervous system as it relates to behavior. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 353 – Psychology of Learning – 3 credits Taught by: Robert Greene
The basic methods in the study of learning. The major theories proposed to account for the learning process. Development of the fundamental concepts and principles governing the learning process in both humans and lower animal. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 355 – Sensation and Perception – 3 credits
The psychological and physiological processes entering into perception. Current research and theory in the light of classical statements of the problems. The role of learning in perceptual functioning. Reading, lectures, demonstrations, and problems. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 357 – Cognitive Psychology – 3 credits Taught by: Robert Greene
How individuals encode, store, organize, and use information. Pattern recognition, attention, memory, and problem solving. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 369 – Adult Development and Aging – 3 credits Taught by: T.J. McCallum
An overview of concepts and research relating to adult development and aging. The lifespan perspective will be used in examining major developmental paradigms. Personality and cognitive lines of development will be traced across the lifespan. Data from both longitudinal and cross-sectional studies will be analyzed. Both normal and pathological aging will be discussed. Special emphasis will be given to areas of cognitive deterioration in aging. Implications for optimal adult development and again will also be discussed.

PSCL 375 – Research Design and Analysis – 3 credits Taught by: Anastasia Dimitropoulos
Conceptual and methodological issues confronted by the behavioral scientist conducting research. Major experimental designs and statistical procedures. Intuitive understanding of the mathematical operations. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 282

PSCL 379 – Neurodevelopmental Disabilities – 3 credits Taught by: Anastasia Dimitropoulos
Ways in which neurobehavioral development can go awry, the causes of such deviations, and their consequences. The course builds on basic psychological and neuroscience concepts to explore the manner in which developmental disabilities occur, ways of preventing disabilities, and approaches to ameliorating and managing disabling conditions. PREREQUISITES: PSCL 101 & PSCL 230

PSCL 388 – Human Sexual Behavior – 3 credits Taught by: Jen Butler
Sex is approached as a form of personal and interpersonal behavior. A broad range of theories from social psychology will be used to explain human sexual behavior, and these will be evaluated by using facts and findings from recent research studies. Topics include sexual relationships, gender differences, promiscuity, rape and coercion, finding and choosing sex partners, sexual risk-taking, harassment, sexual identity and orientation, cultural influences and differences, evolution of sexual motivations, prostitution, pornography, and love. PREREQUISITES: PSCL 101 & PSCL 315

PSCL 390 – Seminars in Psychology – 1-3 credits
Surveys of special subject areas. Topics vary in response to faculty and student interests. Small group discussion. PREREQUISITE depends on content.

PSCL 391 – Psychology Capstone Research Using Data Archives
In this course, each student will derive and address a research question by identifying and analyzing archived publically available data. Successful completion of the course will require: training in ethical research involving human participants; a critical review of the literature on a specific area of psychology with the goal of creating a research question; identification of a set of variables in a publically available dataset that can be used to address the research question, a final written research report in a format acceptable for publication in a psychological research journal, and an oral presentation of the research. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 375. Offered only in the spring semester.

PSCL 392 – Capstone Seminar: Positive Psychology and Character Strengths – 3 credits Taught by: Julie Exline
This seminar-based course is designed to provide a senior capstone experience in the area of positive psychology and character strengths. Students will focus on one specific character strength or positive psychology concept for the class project. The project will include a literature review and critique as well as a self-reflective component. Students will present their projects in two formats: a classroom-based lecture presentation and a literature review (15-20 pages). Class periods will include a blend of lecture, discussion, and student presentations. All students will be assigned to small groups for classroom-based discussions. Assignments are designed to help students develop their projects and will focus on self-reflection, literature review skills, and effective strategies for writing, presenting, and evaluating the work of others.

PSCL 394 – Capstone Seminar: Current Problems – 3 credits Taught by: Lee Thompson, Anastasia Dimitropoulos
This seminar course will revolve around the identification and critical examination of current problems in society. Insights gained from psychological research will be applied to better understand these problems. Successful completion of the course will require critical analysis of published research, integration of information from different areas of psychology and from different disciplines, an oral presentation, and a final written research report including a literature review. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 375

PSCL 395 – Capstone and Honors Program – 3 credits
Supervision in carrying out an independent research study in the student’s area of interest. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 375. Offered every semester. Any student majoring in psychology may take this course to fulfill the capstone requirement; qualified students may take this course to fulfill the capstone requirement AND to graduate with honors in psychology (see following paragraph for requirements). During their junior year, qualified Psychology majors are encouraged to apply to the department’s Honors Program, which leads to a B.A. with Honors in Psychology. The program’s purpose is to provide the students with an intensive, supervised research experience in areas of their choice. The Program consists of PSCL 375 and PSCL 395 and begins in the junior year, when students receive instruction in research design and methodology. This provides the foundation for students to work under close supervision with a department faculty member in the fall of their senior year. At the end of that semester, the research project is written in scholarly form, and presented for consideration of graduation with Honors in Psychology. Junior majors with a minimum 3.25 average in Psychology and a 3.0 overall GPA may apply. The Honors Program requires a great deal of work, and only students with a serious interest in behavioral sciences should apply. An important part of the Honor’s Program is selection of the faculty advisor. A student should select a faculty advisor with interests as close as possible to the area the student intends to research. Make an appointment with the faculty member or email them to inquire about the possibility of doing an honor’s thesis with them. You may either suggest an idea of your own or ask the advisor for a project that you might carry out. In either case, there should be a firm understanding of what will be accomplished (preferably written) before the student registers for the honor’s program.

PSCL 396 – Anxiety and Depression Symptoms, Etiology, and Treatment – 3 credits Taught by: Amy Przeworski
A research-based and writing-intensive presentation of current knowledge regarding the symptom, etiology, and treatment of anxiety disorders and mood disorders.

PSCL 397 – Independent Study – 1-3 credits Individual study involving specific programs of reading, research, and special projects. PREREQUISITE: PSCL 101

PSCL 398C – Child Policy Externship – 3 credits Taught by: Gabriella Celeste
This course provides students with externships in child policy. These externships give students an opportunity to work directly with professionals who design and implement policies that impact the lives of children and their families. Agencies involved are active in the areas of childcare, education, juvenile justice, and physical and mental health. Students apply for the externship. Selected students are placed in a local child policy agency. An individualized learning plan is developed in consultation with the Childhood Studies Program faculty, the supervisor in the agency, and the student. This course is a 3 credit hour course and may be taken twice for a total of 6 credit hours. 3 credits is required for fulfillment of the capstone requirement. PREREQUISITE: CHST 301 or consent, permit required. PSCL 375 recommended. Also offered as ANTH 398C and CHST 398C.

Page last modified: July 27, 2016