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Awards for Graduate Students

AWARDS FOR CLINICAL GRADUATE STUDENTS

Jane Kessler Award for Commitment to Scholarship in the Field of Disabilities (that has the potential to inform educational/clinical policy)
Preference is given to a student in their 4th year or earlier. Faculty determine who has earned this award.

  • Student has served as a Teaching Assistant or course instructorDr. Jane Kessler
  • Arrives on time and prepared for class meetings
  • Ignites interest in course material and stimulates discussion
  • Conveys warmth and respect for students
  • Establishes rapport with students as individuals
  • Course material includes facts, theories, and research findings
  • Course material includes examples, analogies, and anecdotes
  • Course material demonstrations, discussions, and classroom activities
  • Course material is delivered in a clear and organized manner
  • Course material is presented with energy and enthusiasm
  • Able to manage disruptions, problems, and complaints
  • Motivates and inspires students to want to learn
  • Open to feedback and responsive to criticism
  • Course material integrates the science and practice of psychology
  • Student establishes self as the leader, expert, and authority
  • Student displays a calm professional demeanor
  • Student actively mentors more junior graduate students or undergraduate students

Abraham W. Wolf, Ph.D. Endowed Fund for Psychotherapy Research
Students may apply for this in any year. A review board determines who receives this award. This research grant is designed to support high quality research on psychotherapy process or psychotherapy outcome. Proposals are reviewed based on the quality of the research design, the implication of the project on the practice of psychotherapy, and the appropriateness of the budget. For further information click here. Submit questions and applications to James Overholser. For more information on the application process, click here.

The Ethan Schafer Assessment Award
Preference is given to a student in their 4th year or earlier. Faculty determine who has earned this award.

  • This award is for excellence and expertise in assessment as evidenced by conducting outstanding evaluations and writing comprehensive reports and/or doing an excellent job as lead TA in the assessment course and/or making a real contribution in the assessment experience. Faculty determine who has earned this award.

The Morris Parloff Award for an Outstanding Contribution to Clinical Research
Preference is given to a student in their 4th year or earlier. Faculty determine who has earned this award

  • Has completed programmatic research
  • Has successfully proposed doctoral dissertation
  • Program of research builds on or challenges the established theory in the area
  • Program of research uses clinical samples (e.g., therapy clients; those with psychological symptoms)
  • Program of research focuses on modifiable psychological processes
  • Core of the research program deals with the Psyche (mind and mental processes)
  • Research findings have direct implications for clinical practice
  • Research studies have been submitted or accepted for publication
  • The degree to which the research is autonomous versus completed within the advisor’s existing research studies should be considered

The Donald K. Freedheim Award for an Outstanding Contribution to Clinical Service
Preference is given to a student in their 4th year or earlier. Faculty determine who has earned this award.

  • Has exhibited superior clinical skills during therapy placements and practica
  • Has demonstrated clinical sensitivity and rapport building skills during therapy placements and practica
  • Treatments administered were evidence-based and based on scholarly work in psychology
  • The clinical work applies, extends, or challenges an established theory in the area
  • Treatment focused on the Psyche (mind and mental processes)
  • The therapist implemented ongoing psychological assessment throughout the course of care

The Sarah Cain Spannagel Graduate Student Award for Meritorious Service to the Clinical Program, Field or Community
Preference is given to a student in their 4th year or earlier. Faculty determine who has earned this award.

  • Frequently volunteers to help with clinical program or departmental social events and other tasks
  • Remains active and visible in the program even during advanced years
  • Often helpful to members of the faculty as well as peers
  • Serves as an ambassador for the program to people outside the department
  • Serves as student class representative at least one year
  • Brings a positive attitude and a positive energy to the clinical program
  • Communicate in a direct, assertive manner, and professional manner
  • Professionally confronts problems when they arise with undergraduate students, graduate students, or faculty
  • Proactively contributes to clinical program and department
  • Consistently displays constructive efforts to improve the training program
  • Has established strong working relationships with members of the department and our broader professional community
  • Has established self as a leader

Margaret Wilson Travel Award
Students are eligible for this during any year in the program. Students must apply for this award. If you are presenting a paper at a conference, you may apply for this award. You must also apply for the Graduate School Travel Award, as a 50/50 match in funds from your academic department is necessary in order to get the Graduate School Travel Award. The Margaret Wilson Travel Award is the means of providing this match. There are only a limited amount of funds available for the Margaret Wilson Travel Award. Students must first apply for this award through the department. To apply, you send an application to the DCT. You should quickly learn whether you have received the award. You then apply to the graduate school for matching funds. You must apply for this before you go to the conference. Application for this travel award can be found here.

Freedheim Graduate Student Fellowship
Students in their 4th or 5th year are eligible for this award. Students must apply for this award.
Previously named the Brisky Fellowship, the Freedheim Graduate Student Fellowship is awarded annually to full-time graduate students in Psychology pursuing a PhD on a child-related topic that bridges research, practice and policy.  An announcement for applications for this award is usually sent out at the end of the spring semester. The application deadline is usually late summer. Students must have successfully defended their dissertation prospectus in order to apply for this award.

DEPARTMENTAL AWARDS FOR PSYCHOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENTS

The Joseph F. Fagan, III Award for Research Excellence honors the career of an eminent developmental psychologist whose work fundamentally changed our understanding of how babies think. His work was the first to demonstrate that infants could perceive color and hues; retain information about stimuli for as long as 2-weeks; categorize and remember faces along the complex dimensions of gender, age, orientation, and emotion; and demonstrate information processing skills important for problem solving. Dr. Fagan’s work also serves as a model for strong translational science. He developed the Fagan Test of Infant Intelligence recognized as the first infant test capable of predicting school-age intelligence. The test was adopted worldwide as a tool to assess the impact of early neurotoxic exposures. Joe Fagan was a caring mentor to many graduate students during his tenure at CWRU from 1968 through 2013. He cultivated in his students a passion for rigorous research approaches with direct real-world application. Each year, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological Sciences who demonstrates a passion and commitment to research excellence will be selected by the faculty as the recipient of the Joseph F. Fagan, III Award. Students are eligible for this award in any year, but often 4th or 5th year students will have had the most time to demonstrate research excellence. Faculty nominate students and a review board determines who receives the award. An announcement is usually sent out in late fall or early spring.

Douglas K. Detterman Award for Commitment to Scholarship in the Fields of Intelligence and Cognitive Ability

Diversity, Culture, and Community Award
Students in any year in the program are eligible for this award. Faculty determine who has earned this award. This award is given to a graduate student in the Department of Psychological Sciences who demonstrates a passion and commitment to clinical work, research, advocacy, or community service in diversity and culture.

Dennis D. Drotar Award for Research Excellence
In memory of Dr. Drotar’s many contributions to our program and to the field of pediatric psychology, this award will recognize excellence in research related to pediatric psychology. Graduate students in clinical psychology can apply for this award. Criteria are the following:

  • Research Related to pediatric Psychology
  • This could include research with a pediatric population OR research questions highly relevant to pediatric populations.
  • Student is the lead investigator in the study (research project, masters, or dissertation)

A committee will be established to review applications.Students in any year in the program are eligible for this award.

Masters Research Award
Students in their 2nd or 3rd year are eligible for this award. Faculty determine who has earned this award. One student will be selected by faculty as the recipient of this award. Students must have successfully completed their master’s thesis and defense. Considerations will include research excellence, the potential for the work to have an impact on the field, and the degree to which the project/data collection was completed independently.

The Todd “TJ” McCallum Award for Community-Based Scholarship honors the career of a prominent geropsychologist who was not only interested in better understanding the aging process, but how best to care for individuals as they age. Dr. McCallum was also extremely passionate about bringing his research to the community. For example, he opened the “Brain Emporium” on the Case Western Reserve University campus, allowing aging individuals to to sharpen their thinking skills by using cognitive tasks. Each year, a graduate student in the Department of Psychological Sciences who demonstrates a passion for community-based scholarship will be selected by the faculty as the recipient of this award.

Page last modified: September 5, 2018